Wars of the Diadochi > Third War of the Diadochi

Third War of the Diadochi

Alexander the Great - Dove Decoration

Background

The Third War of the Diadochi (314–311 BCE/BC) saw a conflict between Antigonus on one side and Ptolemy I, Lysimachus and Cassander on the other. Ruling over his kingdom in Anatolia, Antigonus launched an invasion of Coele-Syria that was controlled by Ptolemy and besieged the rebuilt Phoenician city of Tyre. Antigonus allied himself with Polyperchon who controlled part of southern Greece known as the Peloponnese.

As the war appeared like it would turn against Cassander who controlled territory in the north, suddenly Antigonus began to appear defeats across Asia. Ptolemy was able to take back Syria and defeat the son of Antigonus named Demetrius I Poliorcetes in the Battle of Gaza in 312 BCE/BC. Antigonus also failed in his conquest over the Nabatea through his officer Athenaeus. Seleucus I Nicator was able to secure control over the eastern portion of the empire by ruling from Babylon in the satrapy of Babylonia.

After losing these engagements Antigonus made peace with Ptolemy I, Lysimachus and Cassander but continued to go to war with Seleucus I Nicator and the rest of the newly formed Seleucid Empire. This conflict would become known as the Babylonian War. There would also still be one final war known as the Fourth War of the Diadochi left to fight. The area of Coele-Syria would play an important role for the major series of wars known as the Syrian Wars that occurred between the successors of the Diadochi over control for the lucrative trade and transportation route the area provided between Greece and Egypt and the rest of Asia.

Wars of the Diadochi

Diadochi Wars

Syrian Wars

Sources

Primary Sources

Secondary Sources